Scientist Lecture Series: Reach Out, Encourage and Mentor Black Students Interested in Science

Holden Forests & Gardens second scientist lecture in the Growing Black Roots: The Black Botanical Legacy series was with Dr. Morgan Halane from the National Park Service. Dr. Halane shared a deeply personal look at his experience as a Black person navigating interest and study in the field of science with nearly 150 participants on […]

Our Workhorse Forests and Acid Rain

By Katie Stuble, HF&G Research Scientist

Our forests are not only beautiful, but also environmental powerhouses, pumping out oxygen, filtering runoff, and storing carbon that would otherwise collect in the atmosphere and contribute to global warming. In fact, forests are our most promising tool to naturally mitigate climate change. But, not all forests are created equal and they vary in their ability to take up and store carbon.

Glow to Return to Cleveland Botanical Garden Nov. 21st

Glow Features an Outdoor Celebration of Lights, Trees and Festive Holiday Experiences 

Popular holiday tradition will provide a safe and enjoyable experience for all 

Glow at the Cleveland Botanical Garden will delight the senses and transport visitors into a safe holiday wonderland outside and in, all season-long beginning on Saturday, November 21 through Sunday, January 3, 2021.  

Bringing Holden Science to the Classroom

At Holden, my job focuses mostly on conducting plant science research. I really love conducting research! There is something thrilling about an unexpected result or a result that answers a long burning question. I even love the months (or years) of data collection that are necessary to answer a research question. But, this week I brought Holden’s research into two different classrooms and it was equally thrilling!

Curating a Collection

As Rhododendron collections manager at Holden Forests and Gardens I wear many ericaceous hats, but at the core of my job is curating the Holden Rhododendron Collection. This role differs from most of the other folks in the Holden Research Department, who are actively trying to create new knowledge and solve problems. My job is to build a plant collection that facilitates this.

Crabapples: a ripe system for research

Crabapples, the wild apple species and cultivars (Malus spp.), are important members of the rose family. Crabapples produce profuse blossom (Fig. 1) and small fruits (Fig. 2)1. Many crabapples are cultivated as ornamental trees or rootstocks, and their apples can be used for preserves1. Common crabapples1 (Fig. 1) include the European crabapple (Malus sylvestris), the Caucasian crabapple (Malus orientalis), the Siberian crabapple (Malus baccata), and the crabapples native to North American such as Malus angustifolia, Malus coronaria, Malus ioensis, and Malus fusca.

Mushroom Month: Shiitake Cultivation and Land-Connection

When many sugar maple, American beech, and a single red oak tree were harvested from Working Woods last year at this time, quite a few tree-tops were left over. This presented us with an opportunity: to reclaim some logs for mushroom cultivation. After all, nothing is wasted in a truly sustainable system, and Working Woods is meant to be a living laboratory and demonstration site for landowners to explore sustainable options for woodland management.

National Mushroom Month Continues – Lessons in Fungal Ecology and Conservation

My name is Claudia and I’m the newest member of the team here at the Long Science Center at Holden Arboretum. I’m a recent graduate of the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry with a Master of Science in Forest Pathology and Mycology. I am joining Holden Forests and Gardens to continue my education and earn my Ph.D. through a joint program with Case Western Reserve University. My research centers on a type of fungi known as mycorrhizal fungi.

The Joy of Coding: Raspberry Pi edition

When I decided that I wanted to pursue a career in ecological research and education I knew that there were a lot of new skills that I was going to learn as I obtained my bachelor’s degree and eventually a PhD. I knew I was going to learn how to develop questions, and design research experiments. Although I learned those things during my journey to becoming a postdoctoral researcher, there were many skills that I also developed that I had never even thought would be necessary.

Conservation Spotlight: Weeding the Natural Areas

By Sarah ModicBradley, HF&G Natural Resources Specialist Around these parts it’s not all too uncommon to engage in a conversation about your big weekend plans to… weed the garden beds! Much of the horticulture staff devote countless hours throughout the week to weeding Holden’s precious beds, and then return home to tend to their very […]

Top 10 Garden Highlights for July at Botanical Garden

Cleveland Botanical Garden   This is a walker’s self-guided tour through the Gardens inside-and-out that will help us to discover the magic of local Nature in July.  Every month is a new top-ten list!  COSTA RICA BIOME:  BUTTERFLIES AND THEIR FLOWERS.  July is the best month to view our neo-tropical butterflies.  They love flying in the bright sunlight and sipping nectar from lantana, coralberry […]

The surprising way Jack-in-the-Pulpit initiates pollination…

By Sarah Kyker, HF&G Research Associate Some of the most fun stories we have in science are about surprising discoveries. Most people think of these as “eureka” moments. We can picture a scientist in a lab seeing something unexpected and shouting with excitement. “Eureka!” But, in science, these “eureka” moments don’t really exist. When we […]

Victory Garden Series: Nothing Beats a Homegrown Tomato!

By HF&G Horticulturist Dawn Gerlica One of the most common reasons people decide to start home vegetable gardens is to get good tomatoes. Science has developed tomatoes for grocery stores that are easier to transport across the country without becoming mush, but those little golf ball mimics are missing the taste and texture of a […]