EVENT POSTPONED :: Jesse Owens’ Oak Tree Legacy to Live on in Cleveland

Due to the stay-at-home advisory issued by the Cuyahoga County Board of Health and the city of Cleveland, the planting of the newly propagated tree from the Jesse Owens Oak that was to take place at Rockefeller Park Lagoon tomorrow, Thursday, November 19th will be postponed until Spring 2021. Local elected officials and business leaders […]

Scientist Lecture Series: Reach Out, Encourage and Mentor Black Students Interested in Science

Holden Forests & Gardens second scientist lecture in the Growing Black Roots: The Black Botanical Legacy series was with Dr. Morgan Halane from the National Park Service. Dr. Halane shared a deeply personal look at his experience as a Black person navigating interest and study in the field of science with nearly 150 participants on […]

Our Workhorse Forests and Acid Rain

By Katie Stuble, HF&G Research Scientist

Our forests are not only beautiful, but also environmental powerhouses, pumping out oxygen, filtering runoff, and storing carbon that would otherwise collect in the atmosphere and contribute to global warming. In fact, forests are our most promising tool to naturally mitigate climate change. But, not all forests are created equal and they vary in their ability to take up and store carbon.

Crabapples: a ripe system for research

Crabapples, the wild apple species and cultivars (Malus spp.), are important members of the rose family. Crabapples produce profuse blossom (Fig. 1) and small fruits (Fig. 2)1. Many crabapples are cultivated as ornamental trees or rootstocks, and their apples can be used for preserves1. Common crabapples1 (Fig. 1) include the European crabapple (Malus sylvestris), the Caucasian crabapple (Malus orientalis), the Siberian crabapple (Malus baccata), and the crabapples native to North American such as Malus angustifolia, Malus coronaria, Malus ioensis, and Malus fusca.

Science on Friday: Spring phenology monitoring wraps for the year

As spring transitions to summer, we’re wrapping up this year’s spring phenology monitoring in Bole Woods at the Holden Arboretum. Have you heard the term phenology before? Phenology is the study of the timing of natural phenomena – anything that has a seasonal signal. When does Trillium flower? When do hummingbirds arrive in northeast Ohio […]

Working To Create A Greener World – Jan. 7, 2019

Responsible Forestry in Working Woods In October 2018, Holden Forests & Gardens ecologist Katie Stuble blogged about research in Working Woods. Here’s a fresh look for the new year on how we understand Working Woods from a forestry and conservation perspective. The State of the Woods Although drastically less than the 95 percent of forested […]

Working To Create A Greener World – Dec. 10, 2018

Reassembling Ohio’s Plant Communities: The Consequences of Climate Change Like people at a buffet, there’s an advantage to arriving early to the party if you’re a plant. Early arriving plant species get easy access to essential resources including light, water and nutrients, and can make it difficult for later-arriving species to gain a foothold in […]

Working To Create A Greener World – Nov. 9, 2018

Training the Next Generation of Scientists at Holden Forests & Gardens A recent agreement with Case Western Reserve University has brought a new crop of graduate students to the Holden Arboretum. Doctorals students Sharon Danielson and Alexa Wagner are earning degrees from Case Western, while being advised by Holden Forests & Gardens scientists. Sharon Danielson […]

Working to Create A Greener World – Oct. 24, 2018

Science in the Working Woods While initially funded with the idea of providing a demonstration of good forest management practices for area landowners, the Working Woods has turned out to be that, and much more. Slated to be implemented starting this winter, forest plots in the Working Woods will see tree thinning, management of exotic […]