The surprising way Jack-in-the-Pulpit initiates pollination…

By Sarah Kyker, HF&G Research Associate Some of the most fun stories we have in science are about surprising discoveries. Most people think of these as “eureka” moments. We can picture a scientist in a lab seeing something unexpected and shouting with excitement. “Eureka!” But, in science, these “eureka” moments don’t really exist. When we […]

Pollinator Research at the Arboretum with Dr. Na Wei

By Dr. Na Wei, Holden Research Scientist Why do we care about pollinators? Pollinators are important creatures in natural ecosystems and our daily life because they provide vital services to wild plants and our crops. Pollinators carry and deliver pollen to facilitate plant fertilization to produce fruits and seeds. These fruits serve as food for […]

Science on Friday: Plant–pollinator interactions and the role of the flower microbiome in crabapples

By Na Wei, Holden Research Scientist Today we are continuing our story of ornamental apples (crabapples). Plants are living in a microbial world. They interact not only with microbes in the soil but also the ones living in their flowers. These microbial partners can be beneficial or harmful, and thus hold the key for plant […]

Exploring the Magnolia Hybrids of David G. Leach

By Connor Ryan, HF&G Rhododendron Collections Manager As the Rhododendron Collections Manager at Holden Forests & Gardens, I have the exciting job of carrying on the legacy of the late David G. Leach. Most of this revolves around the numerous Rhododendron hybrids David created and named, many of which are housed at Holden’s David G. […]

Long-term Research in Forest Ecology in Stebbins Gulch

By David Burke, Ph.D. Vice President for Science and Conservation for Holden Forests & Gardens We began our long-term climate research in Stebbins Gulch in 2006. Our goal was to monitor how plants and soil fungi that associate with plant roots (called mycorrhizal fungi) respond to changes in air and soil temperature and moisture. This shows one […]

Working To Create A Greener World – Dec. 10, 2018

Reassembling Ohio’s Plant Communities: The Consequences of Climate Change Like people at a buffet, there’s an advantage to arriving early to the party if you’re a plant. Early arriving plant species get easy access to essential resources including light, water and nutrients, and can make it difficult for later-arriving species to gain a foothold in […]

Working To Create A Greener World – Nov. 9, 2018

Training the Next Generation of Scientists at Holden Forests & Gardens A recent agreement with Case Western Reserve University has brought a new crop of graduate students to the Holden Arboretum. Doctorals students Sharon Danielson and Alexa Wagner are earning degrees from Case Western, while being advised by Holden Forests & Gardens scientists. Sharon Danielson […]

Working to Create A Greener World – Oct. 24, 2018

Science in the Working Woods While initially funded with the idea of providing a demonstration of good forest management practices for area landowners, the Working Woods has turned out to be that, and much more. Slated to be implemented starting this winter, forest plots in the Working Woods will see tree thinning, management of exotic […]

Working To Create A Greener World – Oct. 17, 2018

Getting To Work In Working Woods Beginning in the fall of 2018, visitors to the Holden Arboretum may notice new activity in Working Woods as we launch a multi-year study to test at the land management techniques to help young forests transform into healthy mature forests. In 2015, Holden Forests & Gardens received a $500,000 […]